Joseph Smith's First Vision

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Joseph Smith's First Vision

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Leading up to the vision:


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God touched his eyes with his finger and said “[Joseph] this is my beloved Son hear him.” As soon as the Lord had touched his eyes with his finger he immediately saw the Savior. After meeting, a few of us questioned him about the matter and he told us at the bottom of the meeting house steps that he was in the House of Father Smith in Kirtland when Joseph made this declaration, and that Joseph while speaking of it put his finger to his right eye, suiting the action with the words so as to illustrate and at the same time impress the [occurrence] on the minds of those unto whom He was speaking.

Diary of Charles Lowell Walker (Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 1980), 2:755–56 [recorded 2 February 1893]
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Topics


Joseph Smith's First Vision


Joseph Smith's claim that he saw the Father and the Son in 1820 has produced a wide variety of criticism. This set of articles addresses the various critical claims related to the First Vision. The linked articles below are designed to help readers to see some of the weaknesses that are found in arguments that are made against Joseph Smith's First Vision accounts. Some of these arguments are currently being advocated in anti-Mormon literature that is handed out near the Sacred Grove in Palmyra, New York. (Click here for full article)


Criticisms of the First Vision accounts



Church discussion of the First Vision accounts


Brief Summary: Has the Church hidden the various accounts of the First Vision over the years? (Click here for full article)
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1832


Brief Summary: Critical analysis of Joseph Smith's 1832 First Vision account (Click here for full article)
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1835


Brief Summary: Critical analysis of Joseph Smith's 1835 First Vision account (Click here for full article)
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1838


Brief Summary: Joseph Smith's 1838 First Vision account is analyzed by critics of the Church in order to use it to prove that the First Vision never occurred. A variety of critical arguments are raised based upon the words Joseph used to describe the events leading up to his First Vision. We examine here the introduction to Joseph's 1838 First Vision account, found in the Pearl of Great Price and separate facts from opinion. (Click here for full article)
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Joseph Smith's first and second "visitation of angels"


Brief Summary: Joseph Smith referred to the what we now know of as the First Vision as the "first visitation of angels." He referred to Moroni's visit as "another vision of angels." (Click here for full article)
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Joseph Smith's 1832 First Vision account states he was 15 years old rather than 14


Brief Summary: In Joseph Smith's 1832 First Vision recital he said that he was "in the 16th year of [his] age" when the manifestation took place but when he created the 1838 account he changed this information to say that he was "in [his] fifteenth year." (Click here for full article)
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Discrepancies in Paul's account of his vision


Brief Summary: Paul the apostle gave more than one account of his vision of the resurrected Lord while on the road to Damascus. Like Joseph Smith's account of the First Vision, Paul's accounts differ in some details but agree in the overall message. (Click here for full article)
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Do Greek scholars solve the discrepancies in Paul's vision accounts?


Brief Summary: The Church's sectarian critics accept Paul's account as true despite the Bible containing apparently frank contradictions in its accounts, while refusing to give Joseph Smith the same latitude. Members of the Church have long pointed out that this is a clear double standard, designed to bias the audience against Joseph from the beginning. Perhaps because of the force of this argument, some critics have begun to argue that no contradiction exists between the versions of Paul's vision. (Click here for full article)
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D&C:84 says God cannot be seen without priesthood


Brief Summary: Critics argue that Joseph Smith claimed that he saw God in 1820 and also claimed that he received the priesthood in 1829. But in a text which he produced in 1832 (DC 84:21-22) it is said that a person cannot see God without holding the priesthood. Therefore, it is claimed that Joseph Smith contradicted himself and this counts as evidence against his calling as an authentic prophet of God. (Click here for full article)
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Was Joseph Smith told that "all the churches of the day were an abomination?"


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Joseph Smith stated that during the First Vision that he was told that "all the churches of the day were an abomination." (Click here for full article)
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A "mormoninfographic" erroneously indicates that the words "God the Father" and "Jesus Christ" appear in Joseph's 1838 account.


Brief Summary: An anti-Mormon "infographic" erroneously indicates that the words "God the Father" and "Jesus Christ" appear in Joseph's 1838 account, however, Joseph only refers to them as "personages." The link between the Father and the Son is only implied by the words spoken by the Father: "This is my beloved Son." (Click here for full article)
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A "mormoninfographic" states that "pillar of fire" is not mentioned in Joseph's 1832 account.


Brief Summary: An anti-Mormon "infographic" claims that Joseph Smith's 1832 account neglects to mention a "pillar of fire." (Click here for full article)
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A "mormoninfographic" indicates that the 1835 "Erastus Holmes" account describes a different vision.


Brief Summary: An anti-Mormon "infographic" indicates that the 1835 "Erastus Holmes" account describes a different vision. This short summary account of the "first visitation of angels" was written in Joseph's journal only five days after he described seeing two "personages" and "many angels." (Click here for full article)
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Prophet's mother said First Vision was of an "angel"


Brief Summary: The Prophet's mother—Lucy Mack Smith—wrote a letter in 1831 which seems to indicate that her son's First Vision consisted of seeing an "angel" instead of Deity. Critics suggest that this demonstrates that the Prophet's story evolved over time and that his claim to have seen God was a relatively late addition to his story. (Click here for full article)
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What is the difference between Joseph Smith's first vision and other reported visions of God at the time?


Brief Summary: Other people reported having visions of God during the early 1800s. What makes Joseph Smith's vision unique? (Click here for full article)
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Criticisms of events leading up to the First Vision



Methodist camp meetings in the Palmyra area


Brief Summary: It is claimed that any association Joseph had with Methodism did not occur until the 1824-25 revival in Palmyra, and that his claim that the "unusual excitement" started with the Methodists in 1820 is therefore incorrect. (Click here for full article)
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Joseph became "partial to the Methodist sect" in 1820


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Joseph didn't become "partial to the Methodist sect" until at least 1823, after Alvin's death, or as late as 1838, rather than in 1820 as he claimed in his 1838 First Vision account. (Click here for full article)
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Were there revivals in 1820?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that there were no religious revivals in the Palmyra, New York area in 1820, contrary to Joseph Smith's claims that during that year there was "an unusual excitement on the subject of religion...indeed, the whole district of country seemed affected by it" (Click here for full article)
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Smith family place of residence in 1820


Brief Summary: It is claimed that there are discrepancies in Joseph's account of his family's early history, which make his 1820 and subsequent revelations impossible, and that there is no evidence that the Smith family was in the Palmyra area in 1820 for the religious excitement and First Vision which Joseph reported. (Click here for full article)
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A FairMormon Analysis of Wikipedia article "First Vision"


Brief Summary: FairMormon analyzes the Wikipedia treatment of the First Vision. (Click here for full article)
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Criticisms of events occurring after the First Vision



Joseph Smith's early conception of God


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Joseph began his prophetic career with a "trinitarian" idea of God, and only later developed his theology of the Godhead. What do we know about Joseph and the early Saints' views on God? (Click here for full article)
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No reference to First Vision in 1830s publications


Brief Summary: It is claimed that there is no reference to the 1838 canonical First Vision story in any published material from the 1830s, and that nothing published in this period mentions that Joseph saw the Father and Son. They also assume that it would have been mentioned in the local newspapers at the time. (Click here for full article)
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Seldom mentioned in LDS publications before 1877


Brief Summary: It is claimed that, “Before the death of Brigham Young in 1877 the first vision was seldom mentioned in Mormon publications.” This evidence implies that the general membership of the LDS Church was not familiar with the First Vision story until late in the nineteenth century. (Click here for full article)
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Brigham Young never mentioned the First Vision?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Brigham Young never mentioned the First Vision. This is false. (Click here for full article)
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No mention in non-LDS literature before 1843


Brief Summary: It is claimed that there is no mention of the First Vision in non-Mormon literature before 1843, and that if the First Vision story had been known by the public before 1840 (when Orson Pratt published it in his pamphlet) that the anti-Mormons “surely” would have seized upon it as an evidence of Joseph Smith’s imposture. (Click here for full article)
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Missionaries 1830 statement about Joseph seeing "God"


Brief Summary: Some have claimed that just because LDS missionaries were teaching around 1 November 1830 that Joseph Smith had previously seen “God” personally it cannot be assumed that this was a reference to God the Father since the Book of Mormon (completed ca. 11 June 1829) refers to Jesus Christ as “the eternal God” (title page; 2 Nephi 26:12). The argument is made that since this evidence indicates that Joseph Smith understood Jesus Christ to be “God” the statement by the missionaries may have simply meant that Joseph Smith had seen the Savior; not necessarily the Father. (Click here for full article)
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No published reference to Father and Son vision until 1838?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that there is no mention of Joseph Smith seeing the Father and Son in any “contemporary” newspaper, diary, LDS publication, or writing of any kind until the year 1838. (Click here for full article)
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Joseph Smith did not know if God existed in 1823?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that according to a historical document published in Kirtland, Ohio in 1835 the Prophet Joseph Smith did not know if God existed in the year 1823. This text, therefore, provides evidence that Joseph Smith simply made up the story about the First Vision happening in the year 1820. (Click here for full article)
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Lucy Mack Smith and the Presbyterians


Brief Summary: It is claimed that since there was a religious revival in Palmyra, New York in 1824-25 which appears to match details of Joseph Smith's official Church history, he must have mistakenly mixed this event in with his narrative about what happened in 1820, and that the Prophet's mother joined the Presbyterian church after Alvin Smith died in late 1823. This contradicts Joseph's statement that she joined in 1820, thereby dating Joseph's First Vision to no earlier than 1823. (Click here for full article)
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Did Joseph join other churches contrary to commandment in vision?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Joseph Smith joined the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist churches between 1820 and 1830—despite the claim made in his 1838 history that he was forbidden by Deity (during the 1820 First Vision experience) from joining any denomination. (Click here for full article)
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Contradiction about knowing all churches were wrong


Brief Summary: In his 1832 account of the First Vision, Joseph Smith said, “I found [by searching the scriptures] that mankind did not come unto the Lord but that they had apostatized from the true and living faith and there was no society or denomination that built upon the gospel of Jesus Christ as recorded in the New Testament.” But in the 1835 account he said, “I knew not who [of the denominations] was right or who was wrong.” It is claimed that thus counts as evidence that the First Vision story evolved over time. (Click here for full article)
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First Vision fabricated to give "Godly authority?"


Brief Summary: It is claimed that Joseph Smith decided after he released the Book of Mormon to the public that he needed 'authority from God' to justify his claims as a religious minister. Therefore, it is claimed that he fabricated the First Vision story in order to provide himself with a more prestigious line of authority than that of the "angel" who revealed the golden plates. (Click here for full article)
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First Vision story became more detailed and colorful after 1832?


Brief Summary: Some claim that Joseph Smith’s account of the First Vision grew more detailed and more colorful after he first recorded it in 1832. (Click here for full article)
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1838 account modified to offset leadership crisis?


Brief Summary: It is claimed that in 1838 Joseph Smith revised his personal history to say that his original call came from God the Father and Jesus Christ rather than an angel. His motive for doing this was to give himself a stronger leadership role because an authority crisis had recently taken place and large-scale apostasy was the result. (Click here for full article)
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Persecution after the vision?


Brief Summary: Some claim that there is no evidence that Joseph or his family were persecuted because of the First Vision. They argue that this means that Joseph invented the story later. (Click here for full article)
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Andrew Jenson called one of the personages in the First Vision an "angel"


Brief Summary: A history article printed in 1888 by assistant Church historian Andrew Jenson twice referred to one of the visitors as an "angel." (Click here for full article)
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Doctrinal criticisms related to the First Vision



Does Doctrine and Covenants 121:28 contradict the First Vision?


Brief Summary: In 1839 Joseph Smith received a revelation from God in which it was stated that the time would come "in the which nothing shall be withheld, whether there be one God or many gods they shall be manifest" (D&C 121:28). This was an "unnecessary revelation," since according to the official LDS Church First Vision account Joseph Smith supposedly knew that there was more than one God since 1820. This information counts as evidence that the Prophet's story was fraudulent. (Click here for full article)
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God the Father as a Spirit versus Embodied


Brief Summary: When the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants was published in 1835 it portrayed God the Father as a personage of spirit whereas Jesus Christ was portrayed as a personage of tabernacle, or one having a physical body. Yet the official LDS First Vision story portrays the Father as a physical Being. (Click here for full article)
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Personages seen by Joseph Smith


Brief Summary: A list of known personages who appeared to the Prophet Joseph Smith or who were seen by him in vision. (Click here for full article)
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Brigham Young and the First Vision


Brief Summary: It is claimed either that Brigham never taught about the First Vision, or that he taught that the Lord did not appear to Joseph. Both claims are false. (Click here for full article)
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Did the Church hide accounts of the First Vision?


The claim is sometimes made by critics that the LDS Church hides the various accounts of Joseph Smith's First Vision that are not in its official canon. The following chronological database (compiled by FairMormon volunteer Edward Jones) demonstrates conclusively that this is simply not the case. The various accounts of the First Vision have been widely acknowledged in LDS-authored sources throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. (Click here for full article)

LDS-Authored Publications (1910-1968)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1910-1968) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (1969-1978)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1969-1978) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (1979-1983)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1979-1983) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (1984-1989)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1984-1989) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (1990-1997)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1990-1997) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (1998-2003)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (1998-2003) (Click here for full article)
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LDS-Authored Publications (2004-Present)


Brief Summary: Mentions of the various accounts of the First Vision in LDS publications (2004-Present) (Click here for full article)
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Primary sources related to Joseph Smith's First Vision


Original text of Joseph's accounts of the First Vision (Click here for full article)

1832 account


Brief Summary: This is the earliest known account of the First Vision written by Joseph Smith. Source: Joseph Smith Letterbook 1, pp. 1-6. Published in: Dean Jessee, Personal Writings of Joseph Smith. (Click here for full article)
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1835 account


Brief Summary: This account was written by Joseph Smith in his diary. Joseph described his vision to Robert Matthias, also known as "Joshua the Jewish minister". Joseph Smith Diary (1835–1836), original in Joseph Smith Collection, LDS Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah. Published in: Dean Jessee, Personal Writings of Joseph Smith. (Click here for full article)
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1835 (Erastus Holmes account)


Brief Summary: Erastus Holmes account Deseret News 2.15 (May 29, 1852); also in Millennial Star 15. 27 (July 2, 1853): 424; Jessee, The Papers of Joseph Smith, 2: 79-80; cf. Dan Vogel (editor), Early Mormon Documents (Salt Lake City, Signature Books, 1996–2003), 5 vols, 1:207.; DHC 2. 312. (Click here for full article)
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1840 (Orson Pratt account)

(Click here for full article)
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1842 (Joseph Smith History of the Church)


Brief Summary: "Joseph Smith’s History of the Church," Times and Seasons 3. 10 (15 Mar. 1842): 726-28 (Click here for full article)
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1842 (Wentworth letter account)


Brief Summary: Wentworth letter. (Times and Seasons, 3.9 (1 Mar. 1842), p. 706-710 (Click here for full article)
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1842 (Orson Hyde account)

(Click here for full article)
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1843 (The Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette)


Brief Summary: “The Prairies, Nauvoo, Joe Smith, the Temple, the Mormons, etc.,” editor, David Nye White, The Pittsburgh Weekly Gazette 58 (September 15, 1843): 3 (Click here for full article)
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1843 (Levi Richards account)


Brief Summary: Levi Richards’s diary about Joseph Smith preaching in the summer of 1843 and repeating the Lord’s first message to him that no church was His (see Andrew F. Ehat and Lyndon W. Cook, The Words of Joseph Smith: The Contemporary Accounts of the Nauvoo Discourses of Joseph Smith, 2nd Edition, (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, 1996), 215. (Click here for full article)
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1844 (Daniel Rupp account)


Brief Summary: : “Latter Day Saints, by Joseph Smith, Nauvoo, Illinois,” in I. Daniel Rupp, HE PASA EKKLESIA: An Original History of the Religious Denominations at Present Existing in the United States (Philadelphia: J. Y. Humphreys, 1844), pp. 404; The account for Rupp was published in the original history of the Church published in “History of Joseph Smith,” Millennial Star 22. 7 (February 18, 1860): 102-3; also in Dean Jesse, Papers of Joseph Smith, 1:448. (Click here for full article)
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1844 (Alexander Neibaur account)


Brief Summary: Alexander Neibaur Journal, 24 May 1844 (Click here for full article)
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1893 (Charles L. Walker account)


Brief Summary: As told by John Alger (Click here for full article)
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