Question: Why wasn't the prohibition against same-sex relationships rescinded when the rest of the law of Moses was rescinded?


Question: Why wasn't the prohibition against same-sex relationships rescinded when the rest of the law of Moses was rescinded?

While the law of Moses was fulfilled in Christ, Christ specifically taught against fornication and adultery, which would include same-sex relationships

Why wasn't the prohibition against same-sex relationships rescinded when the rest of the law of Moses was recinded? Is it hypocritical for the Church to follow part of the law of Moses and not the rest?

As Latter-day Saints, we are blessed to be guided by modern revelation. We do not need to limit our understanding on what has been able to make it through the centuries. However, some critics have asserted that our stance on same-sex relationships should have been recinded with the rest of the law of Moses.

While the law of Moses was fulfilled in Christ, Christ specifically taught against fornication and adultery, which would include same-sex relationships. After Peter received a vision that the law of Moses had been fulfilled, the prohibition against fornication remained intact.

Adultery, which includes all sexual relationships outside that of a husband and a wife, was forbidden under the 10 commandments

Adultery, which includes all sexual relationships outside that of a husband and a wife, was forbidden under the 10 commandments. Exodus 20:14 reads:

Thou shalt not commit adultery.

Leviticus expands on what types of relationships qualify as adultery. As with much of the Old Testament, it was written for a male audience. Sexual relationships between females was not specifically condemned in Leviticus, but is covered in the 10 commandments. Leviticus 18:22 reads:

Thou shalt not lie with mankind, as with womankind: it is abomination.

Again in Leviticus 20:13, it reads:

If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them.

These laws were well known among the Jews, and other Old Testament versus must be read with these laws in mind. This is not the law we follow today, as we do not recommend death to those who break. We instead follow what Christ taught.

Christ reiterated the Old Testament's command against fornication, and additionally taught against lust and divorce

Christ reiterated the Old Testament's command against fornication, and additionally taught against lust and divorce. While emphasizing these commands, he also taught against condemmning those who committed these actions. To the woman taken in adultery, he told her:

Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more. (John 8:11)

This departs from the Old Testament command that "they shall surely be put to death" without retracting the stance that adultery is indeed a sin. While we do not know whether she committed adultery with a man or a woman, the teaching apply to both genders. It is a sin, but condemn others.

Through revelation through the Holy Ghost, it was revealed that the law of Moses was fulfilled, but that it should still be required of the converts that they abstain from fornication, among other things

Christ fulfilled the law of Moses, but the early Christians were not sure what this meant. At the beginning, the Christians continued to follow the law of Moses, including prohibitions against same-sex relationships. Then Peter had a vision where he saw a sheet containing four-footed beasts, which were against the law of Moses to eat. He was commanded to eat, but he resisted, because it was against the law of Moses. The Lord responded:

What God hath cleansed, that call not thou common. (Acts 10:15)

Later Peter was invited to eat with a Gentile names Cornelious, which was also against the law of Moses. Peter understood the revelation meant that it was no longer necessary to follow the law of Moses. (See Acts 10 for the whole story) However, the question remained what needed to be followed and what didn't. Of particular concern, people wanted to know if circumcision was necessary, which would be quite difficult for older male converts to follow. The guidelines given in the conference were as follows:

For it seemed good to the Holy Ghost, and to us, to lay upon you no greater burden than these necessary things; that ye abstain from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and from things strangled, and from fornication: from which if ye keep yourselves, ye shall do well. Fare ye well. (Acts 15:28-29)

Through revelation through the Holy Ghost, it was revealed that the law of Moses was fulfilled, but that it should still be required of the converts that they abstain from fornication, among other things. The command against fornication was repeated throughout the New Testament.

While the law of Moses was fulfilled through Christ, the prohibition against same-sex relationships continued through the command against fornication.

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