Utah

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Subjects dealing with the state of Utah

This page is a summary or index. More detailed information on this topic is available on the sub-pages below.

Topics



Critics charge that Utah was a hotbed of violence, murder, and lawlessness, and that this can be attributed to LDS doctrine and practices. (Click here for full article)

  • Castration in the 1800's
    Brief Summary: I have read about a group of men (LDS) that went around castrating immoral men (who were also LDS) with the express permission of local church leaders. These events supposedly happened during the Brigham Young's administration. It is claimed that Brigham was aware of and approved of this and may have given the order. What can you tell me about this? I read that missionaries who selected plural wives from female converts before allowing church leaders to select from them first were castrated. (Click here for full article)
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  • Crimes critics allege to have been "worthy of death" in the 1800's
    Brief Summary: Critics expand to idea of blood atonement to include a long list of crimes that were alleged to be "worthy of death." (Click here for full article)
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  • Aaron Dewitt letter
    Brief Summary: A letter from Aaron Dewitt is used by critics to highlight Utah's supposed "culture of violence" (Click here for full article)
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  • Pornography use in Utah
    Brief Summary: Why does Utah lead the United States in subscriptions to online adult entertainment? Utah has significant restrictions on the display and sales of hard core pornographic materials. The Utah Statutes [1] have the effect of making it much more difficult to get easy access to adult material. This forces those who might otherwise buy magazines or other adult materials to use the web to get access to that information. In Utah, access to most adult entertainment requires the use of the Internet. Therefore, the number of Internet users of pornography would be higher than states with different laws if all other factors were the same. (Click here for full article)
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  • Plastic surgery in Utah
    Brief Summary: Some people claim that the large number of plastic surgeons in Utah is an indictment of Mormon superficiality or preoccupation with appearance. (Click here for full article)
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  • Bankruptcy rate in Utah
    Brief Summary: Is it true that Utah has the highest personal bankruptcy rate in the United States? If so, what does this say about Latter-day Saint attitudes toward wealth and materialism? (Click here for full article)
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  • Suicide rate among Latter-day Saints in Utah
    Brief Summary: Critics charge that the suicide rate in Utah is higher than the national average, and that this demonstrates that being a Latter-day Saint is psychologically unhealthy. (Click here for full article)
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  • Use of antidepressants in Utah
    Brief Summary: Critics charge that the rate of antidepressant use is much higher among Mormons than the general population. They claim this is evidence that participation in the LDS Church is inordinately stressful due to pressure for Mormons to appear "perfect." (Click here for full article)
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  • LDS population in Utah
    Brief Summary: Critics of the Church and misinformed members of the mainstream media sometimes claim that the number of Latter-day Saints in Utah has fallen. This belief led the producers of the anti-Mormon video Search for the Truth to claim that "within Utah, we are doing a fairly good job of combating Mormonism" and therefore "the Mormon Church is vulnerable" to anti-Mormon criticisms. But such authors are simply incorrect, according to figures from the U.S. Census and the LDS Church Almanac. (Click here for full article)
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In September 1857 a group of Mormons in southern Utah killed all adult members of an Arkansas wagon train that was headed for California. Critics charge that the massacre was typical of Mormon "culture of violence," and claim that Church leaders—possibly as high as Brigham Young—approved of, or even ordered the killing. (Click here for full article)

    • Summary
      Brief Summary: In September 1857 a group of Mormons in southern Utah killed all adult members of an Arkansas wagon train that was headed for California. Critics charge that the massacre was typical of Mormon "culture of violence," and claim that Church leaders—possibly as high as Brigham Young—approved of, or even ordered the killing. (Click here for full article)
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    • Brigham Young
      Brief Summary: Critics make numerous charges and claims against Brigham Young in relation to the Massacre. Most of these are ill-founded or misrepresented. (Click here for full article)
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    • Prosecution
      Brief Summary: Critics charge that Brigham Young blocked prosecution of those who committed the Mountain Meadows Massacre. (Click here for full article)
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    • Thomas Kane
      Brief Summary: Some who use the Mountain Meadows Massacre to attack the Church often mention non-LDS Col. Thomas Kane. Kane was a good friend to the Mormons prior to Joseph Smith's death, and he was also briefly involved in the Massacre issue. There are two issues raised by critics in conjunction with Kane: 1) some blame Kane for helping Brigham Young to cover up the Massacre, 2) some paint Kane as ridiculous, vain, or foolish—this is apparently done on the theory that anyone who likes or helps the Mormons must either be evil or a dupe. (Click here for full article)
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    • Other personalities involved in Mountain Meadows
      Brief Summary: A variety of charges or claims are made about other observers or participants in the events at Mountain Meadows. (Click here for full article)
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